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"Wokou Junk. Mercenary warship."
In-game description

The Wokou Junk is a mercenary warship in Age of Empires III: The Asian Dynasties. It can be shipped by the Japanese and Chinese (Indians receive Marathan Catamaran instead), and is also trainable on some maps if a trading post is built on Zen settlement.

Overview Edit

Special ability Edit

Broadside attack Broadside Attack: Fires a volley of cannon shots at an enemy ship from a range of 28, with each shot causing 80 siege damage. 60 seconds cooldown.

Units Edit

The Wokou Junk must be close to the shore to train the units, and will also be unable to move and attack while doing so.

Age Unit Cost Pop. Limit
Ages discovery
Orangutan icon Old Doug the Orangutan 200 food - 5
Ages colonial
Masterless Samurai Wokou Ronin 200 coin 3
Blind Monk Wokou Monk 120 coin
Wokou Pirate Wokou Pirate 115 coin 4
Mongol Rider Wokou Horseman 180 coin 5

Further statistics Edit

Unit strengths and weaknesses
Strong vs. Ships, infantry and buildings close to shore
Weak vs. Artillery especially Culverins, defensive structures
Improvements
Hit points Armor Plating Armor Plating (+50%)
Rawhide Covers Rawhide Covers (+20%, Iroquois only)
Attack Carronade Carronade (+25%)
Percussion Lock Percussion Lock (+50% Broadside Attack damage)
Flaming Arrows Flaming Arrows (+25%, Sioux only)
Sight Town Watch Town Watch (+2)
Speed Apache Endurance Apache Endurance (+5%)
Penalties Coffee Trade Coffee Trade (-10% speed, Dutch only)

Home City Cards Edit

History Edit

"The oldest references to the Chinese sailing vessel known as the “junk” date back to the Han Dynasty (220 BCE-200 CE), although it is generally believed that the junk was in use even earlier. The term “junk” has many origins, including roots in the Portuguese “junco,” the French “junque,” the Dutch “jonk,” the Malay “jon,” and the Javanese “djong.” The junk is identified by its high stern, projecting bow, and square linen sails. The sails are spread and contracted in an action similar to that of collapsible Venetian blinds. Instead of a keel, the junk has a large rudder. Junks were integral in Chinese trade and exploration up until the nineteenth century.

The term "wokou" is a combination of the Chinese word “wo,” referring to Japanese, and "kou,” meaning bandit or invasion.

Beginning in the thirteenth century, no group of sailors was as feared or as mighty as the plundering wokou pirates, a clan of Japanese raiders and smugglers who terrified the Chinese and Korean coasts. The first attacks occurred in 1223, triggering immediate calls for the Kamakura shogunate of Japan to corral these scoundrels and prevent further attacks on the Korean coast. In 1227, as a show of strength, the shogun had ninety suspected wokou pirates decapitated before the visiting Korean envoy.

During the Mongol invasions of the mid-thirteenth century, wokou attacks fell in number, most likely due to a heightened military preparedness on the part of both the Japanese and Korean governments. But this did not last. In the late fourteenth century, as central authority in Japan weakened, the wokou took full advantage, even branching out to initiate attacks along the coast of China. They profited highly from a severe trade embargo forced on Japan by the Qin and then Ming Dynasties of China, reaping rewards as black markets flourished. The wokou experienced periods of rise and decline, even attacking China with a makeshift fleet in 1419, but they ultimately became obsolete.

At its peak, the wokou culture was enough to threaten even the most powerful Asian rulers, and to appeal to the most ordinary of citizenry. Many men left behind their lives to seek fortunes at sea. Chinese merchants, militiamen, smugglers, Korean pirates, Portuguese sailors, traders, and even missionaries joined up with the notorious wokou pirates.
"

Marauding Junk Edit

The Marauding Junk is the treasure guardian version of the Wokou Junk. They usually guard very abundant treasures.

Special ability Edit

Broadside attack Broadside Attack: Fires a volley of cannon shots at an enemy ship within attack range, with each shot causing 80 siege damage. 60 seconds cooldown.

History Edit

"The oldest references to the Chinese sailing vessel known as the “junk” date back to the Han Dynasty (220 BCE to 200 CE), although it is generally believed to have come about earlier. The term “junk” has many origins, including roots in the Portuguese “junco,” the French “junque,” the Dutch “jonk,” the Malay “jon,” and the Javanese “djong.” The junk is identified by its high stern, projecting bow, and square linen sails. The sails are spread and contracted in an action similar to that of collapsible Venetian blinds. Instead of a keel, the junk has a large rudder. Junks were integral in Chinese trade and exploration up until the nineteenth century."

Gallery Edit

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