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"Stealthy horsemen that grow in strength as they grow in number."

In-game description

The Tashunke Prowler is a melee heavy cavalry in Age of Empires III: The WarChiefs that is unique to the Sioux and can be trained at the Corral once the Fortress Age is reached. It is a stealthy cavalry unit that become stronger in large groups.

Overview Edit

The Tashunke Prowler is unique in that for every other Tashunke Prowlers in a radius of 20 around them, it gains +5% hit points and +10% attack, which is cumulative with each other. It is also the only cavalry unit that has stealth ability (except the Sioux War Chief with the Center of Power Home City Card).

Effective against Artillery and light infantry, they are trained at the Corral from the Fortress Age. They deal Area of Effect damage and are effective massed in later Ages but are relatively weaker since they lack direct upgrades (for example, Champion). They have a build limit of 12.

Further statistics Edit

As the Tashunke Prowler can only be trained by the Sioux, only improvements available to them (including native improvements) are listed here.

Unit strengths and weaknesses
Strong vs. Ranged infantry, light infantry, artillery
Weak vs. Heavy infantry, light cavalry
Improvements
Hit points Horsemanship Horsemanship (+10%)
Cavalry Cuirass Cavalry Cuirass (+10%)
Comanche Horse Breeding Comanche Horse Breeding (+10%)
Cree Tanning Cree Tanning (+5%)
Navajo Weaving Navajo Weaving (+5%)
Attack Bonepipe Armor Bonepipe Armor (+1.0x multiplier vs. artillery)
Pillage Pillage (+25% siege attack)
Yoga Yoga (+5%)
Speed Comanche Mustangs Comanche Mustangs (+10%)
Apache Endurance Apache Endurance (+5%)
Creation speed Cheyenne Horse Trading Cheyenne Horse Trading (-25%)
Inca Chaquis Messengers Incan Chasquis Messengers (-25%)
Train cost Mapuche Ad-mapu Mapuche Ad-mapu (-10% coin cost)

Home City Cards Edit

As the Tashunke Prowler is exclusive to the Sioux, only other civilizations' TEAM cards that affects them are listed here.

Trivia Edit

  • The unit's name is an anglicization of Tȟašúŋke, which means "horse" in the Lakota language.

History Edit

"The primary means for a Plains warrior to gain glory on the battlefield involved acts of courage in battle - such as killing enemies, stealing horses, or taking weapons - which won prestige and enabled an individual to rise above fellow tribesmen as a warrior and leader.

For some groups, the highest honor of all was given to those warriors who managed to get close enough to touch an enemy and escape without killing him - a practice known as counting coup ("coup" is a French word meaning "blow"). A warrior could make contact with his hand, a weapon such as a club, spear, or bow, or even a specially crafted coup stick.
"

Gallery Edit

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