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Siege of Athens is the sixth scenario of the Glory of Greece campaign. The Athenians (Blue) must defend their homeland from the Assyrian Aegina (Brown) and the Greek Sparta (Red and Yellow).

Scenario instructions[]

Description[]

Athens, 405 BCE

Over the past several centuries, the Greek city-states have expanded their influence both in Hellas and overseas. Now, a powerful coalition led by the dual monarchy of Sparta is challenging your city-state of Athens for dominance in a conflict that has lasted three decades. In the wake of the disastrous Sicilian Expedition, Sparta has seized the initiative, claiming several key victories and drawing ever closer to Athens. You have no hope of defeating the battle-hardened Spartans in the field at present, but there is a chance that you may be able to defend the city long enough for reinforcements and supplies to arrive and turn the tide in your favor. The Spartan army is reliant on a large baggage train of supplies—if it is captured, their siege will be delayed considerably.
—In-game section of the Definitive Edition

Starting conditions[]

Objectives[]

  • Capture the Spartan baggage train (represented by four Artifacts).

Hints[]

  • The Spartan army is upon us! Hurry! Get all your villagers within the city walls of Athens before it is too late!
  • Maintain the strength of your fortifications at all costs.
  • Send villagers to the nearby islands to seek the resources required to support your army.

Description[]

Over the past 500 years the Greeks have grown strong at home and overseas. Their interference in Persian affairs attracted two Persian invasions, but these were turned back. Now the Greeks are squabbling at home over dividing the spoils of Mediterranean trade. Sparta and Athens are fighting for dominance. The Spartan army is approaching Athens and is too powerful now to be met in open combat. Defend the walls to delay them while the army is reinforced. Athenian farmland is outside the walls, unfortunately, so your food sources are probably lost. Use the Athenian advantage at sea to obtain food and trade overseas. The Spartans are not thought to have naval power, but that may change. When your armies have been strengthened, engage the Spartan army and drive it from your lands. The Spartans have brought a large baggage train of supplies. If that can be captured, they will be forced to fall back.
—In-game section

Starting conditions[]

Objectives[]

Hints[]

  • Maintain the strength of your walls and towers at all costs.
  • Immediately send trade vessels to seek the resources needed to build up your army.

Players[]

Player[]

  • Player (Greeks) - The Player occupies the city of Athens and some hinterland. The earlier is fortified while the latter is almost unprotected against the enemy armies. The player controls almost no resources except for the farms and relies on overseas expansion.

Enemies[]

  • Spartan Army (Greeks): starts with a large Phalanx army and some Bowmen in the western corner of the map. They attack immediately.
  • Spartan Navy (Greeks): possess a fortified port and some buildings at the southern edge of the map and attacks with Triremes. The player can trade with them despite being enemies, but has to sink the Spartans' navy and raze their defences (including some Helepoli) beforehand.
  • Theban Army (Greeks): The Theban Army starts with a large army composed of cavalry, catapults, and Composite Bowmen at the same position as red Sparta.

Player[]

  • Player (Greeks) - The Player occupies the city of Athens and some hinterland. The earlier is fortified while the latter is almost unprotected against the enemy armies. The player controls almost no resources except for the farms. On the contrary, the player controls the entire sea in this scenario since there is no enemy navy.

Enemies[]

  • Sparta (Greeks): starts with a large Phalanx army, some Bowmen, and Hero Jason in the western corner of the map. They attack immediately.
  • Sparta (Greeks): possess a port and some buildings at the center of the south-eastern edge of the map and is entirely passive so the player can trade with them despite being enemies.
  • Aegina (Assyrians): Aegina starts with a large Heavy Cavalry army and few Composite Bowmen at the same position as red Sparta.

Strategy[]

NOTE: this section applies to the original scenario.

The Spartan army is right outside the town, so pull all soldiers and Villagers behind the walls and wait for their attack. Have the Villagers gather what there is of wood there, and train Fishing Ships for Food. Trading with the Spartan Dock to the south can give you gold.

When the Spartans attack, send the Phalanxes out to kill everything that moves, and keep the archers behind the walls and towers. Repair when your defenses are damaged.

Once the Spartan advance has been beaten back, send your forces west to find the Artifacts. Once all of them are under your control, the scenario is over.

History[]

Historical notes[]

By the 5th century BCE, the region of Hellas (as the Greeks called modern-day Greece) was dominated by a number of several powerful city-states, such as Athens, Sparta, Thebes, and Corinth. These city-states tended to compete with each other economically, militarily, and culturally, but were briefly galvanized by a pair of dangerous invasions conducted by the Achaemenid Empire. This period was termed as the Persian Wars, and yielded some of the most popular narratives to come out of the classical era, such as the heroic but doomed defense of the coastal passage of Thermopylae by King Leonidas of Sparta and his 300 warriors. In the wake of the victory over the Persians, the Greek city-states flourished and expanded their influence further than ever before.

Two city-states arose to prominence during this time. Athens was the leader of the powerful Delian League, a thalassocracy of city-states and territories that encompassed much of the Aegean Sea, dominating the economic climate of the region and boasting quite possibly the most powerful navy in the Mediterranean seen to date. Sparta, on the other hand, headed the fearsome Peloponnesian League, a formidable land-based power built on a slave economy and rigorous military training. Although the focus of each alliance was largely different, the tension between them began to increase as time went on.

By 431 BCE, a Theban-Spartan attack on Plataea (an Athenian ally) had drawn the Delian and Peloponnesian Leagues into a deadly war that would last nearly thirty years. Thucydides' vivid account of the events of the entire Peloponnesian War demonstrates considerable early success on the part of the Athenian navy—a success that was nevertheless tempered by the effects of a devastating plague that ravaged Attica, killing roughly half of ist population. The conflict carried on for years with relatively equal victories and defeats seen by both sides, but the balance was tipped by the folly of the disastrous Sicilian Expedition of 415-413 BCE, which cost Athens 100 triremes, 30,000 oarsmen, and virtually a generation of citizen-soldiers. Their military power was crippled considerably.

Although Athens attempted to recover over the next several years, the Spartans were able to push into Attica, while simultaneously defeating the Athenian navy at Aegospotomai in 405 BCE. lts naval supply cut, the City of Athens had no choice but to surrender to the besieging Spartans, Who humbled the once great power and ended the war. Internal difficulties plagued the Peloponnesian League, however, and democracy was soon restored in Athens.
—In-game section

Victory[]

Your intrepid defense has thus far parried the assaults of the feared Spartan alliance! Deprived of their supply train, the Spartans grow discouraged as they watch ships bringing provisions into Athens each day. In frustration, they have turned to pillaging the nearby countryside, while your citizens watch them from the safety of the high walls of their citadel.< /br>< /br>This jubilation is not to last, however. Word has finally reached Athens of the Spartan victory at Aegospotomai and the destruction of the Athenian fleet. Without a navy, it will not be long before your supply lines, in turn, are cut. Perhaps the Spartans will be willing to negotiate a peaceful settlement to the war?
—In-game section

Loss[]

The combined might of the Spartan land and naval forces was too much for your garrison. As the Spartan army advanced towards the walls of Athens, the harbor of Piraeus was blockaded by a plethora of Spartan ships, preventing any supplies from reaching the city from the Aegean. With supplies running low and morale even lower, you have no choice but to surrender to the enemy. Pray to Athena that they will be merciful!
—In-game section

Historical notes[]

By 700 BC, independent city-states had arisen from the ruins of the Dark Age in Greece, including Athens, Sparta, Thebes, and Corinth. These city-states competed with each other economically, militarily, and ideologically for dominance of the region, in a manner similar to the palace kingdoms of the Mycenean era. This was the Classical Age of Greece, one of the most influential eras in human history. Works in philosophy, science, literature, art, mathematics, and history from the revived and resurgent Greek culture provided much of the foundation for all civilizations that followed. This was the time of Aristotle, Plato, Homer, Socrates, Euclid, Archimedes, Hippocrates, Herodotus, and many others. Greeks experimented with democracy, developed the scientific method, and built the fabulous library at Alexandria.

Athens was the largest and richest state, thanks to its great port and large silver deposits. Athenians were the leading shipbuilders and sailors of Greece. The Spartans were the ultimate warriors, disciplined from childhood for service in the phalanx. The mere appearance of the hardened and merciless Spartan phalanx on a battlefield could be enough to panic opponents before a blow had been struck.

The competition between cities spread overseas among colonies along the Black Sea coast, in Asia Minor, in North Africa, in modern Italy, and in modern France. Trade made the Greek culture one of the richest in the ancient world and became critical to its well-being. Increasing populations could not be supported by local food production alone and markets were needed for manufactured goods.

Following the defeat of two Persian invasions, the Athenians and Spartans vied for dominance of both the peninsula and overseas possessions like Sicily. Smaller states joined one side or the other and eventually the Peloponnesian War broke out between the two factions.
—In-game section

Historical outcome[]

The Spartans were not able to take Athens at first because of the Athenian "Long Walls" that enclosed the city, the access route to the port of Piraeus on the coast, and the port itself. Although the Spartans devastated the countryside, the Athenians were able to withstand a siege by importing food and supplies by sea.

After many years of conflict throughout the Mediterranean, the Spartans gained the upper hand by building a large fleet of their own and defeating the Athenian navy in 405 BC. When the Spartans invaded Attica again, the Athenians surrendered in 404 BC after much starvation. As part of the peace agreement, the Long Walls were torn down, Athenian democracy was abolished, and the Delian league of Athens and its allies was broken up.

The Spartan victory that ended the war did not bring peace or unity to Greece, however. Democracy was restored in Athens in 403 BC and fighting between different states erupted again. In the midst of this turmoil little notice was given to the rising strength of Macedonia to the north along the barbarian hinterlands.
—In-game section

Trivia[]

  • The odd name "Hero 12" of the unique cavalry unit in the original release seems to be a development goof.
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