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Slow, infinite source of Food or Coin. Limited to 10 gatherers.
In-game description

The Rice Paddy is an economic building in Age of Empires III: The Asian Dynasties that is unique to the Asian civilizations (Chinese, Indians, and Japanese). It combines the functions of a Mill and a Plantation by acting as an infinite source of food and coin, but not both; the Rice Paddy must be configured to provide either resource at one time.

Although the gather rates of Rice Paddies are slower than Mills and Plantations (0.5 food and 0.34 coin), Villagers gathering from a Rice Paddy do not wander around, thus eliminating the need to "optimize" the gather rate by limiting each Rice Paddy to be gathered by up to 7 villagers.

Technologies Edit

Age Technology Cost Effect
Ages colonial
Paddy threshing Paddy Threshing 150 wood,
150 coin
Villagers gather from Mills, Farms, and Rice Paddies (food) 15% faster
Rice Surplus Rice Surplus 200 food,
200 wood
Villagers gather from Plantations and Rice Paddies (coin) 10% faster
Ages fortress
Irrigation Channels Irrigation Channels 150 wood,
150 coin
Villagers gather from Mills, Farms, and Rice Paddies (food) 15% faster; requires Paddy Threshing
Rice Trade Rice Trade 400 food,
400 wood
Villagers gather from Plantations and Rice Paddies (coin) 20% faster; requires Rice Surplus
Ages industrial
Dike-Controlled Canals Dike-Controlled Canals 150 wood,
150 coin
Villagers gather from Mills, Farms, and Rice Paddies (food) 15% faster; requires Irrigation Channels
Rice Markets Rice Markets 400 food,
400 wood
Villagers gather from Plantations and Rice Paddies (coin) 20% faster; requires Rice Trade
Rice Exports Rice Exports Villagers gather from Plantations and Rice Paddies (coin) 20% faster; requires Rice Markets
Ages imperial
Mechanized Rice Cultivation Mechanized Rice Cultivation 1,000 wood,
1,000 coin
Villagers gather from Mills, Farms, and Rice Paddies (food) 50% faster; requires Dike-Controlled Canals
Collective Economy Collective Economy 1,000 food,
1,000 wood
All coin gathering (but not trickles, shipments, and Trade Routes) is 50% faster; requires Rice Exports

Further statistics Edit

As the Rice Paddy is unique to Asian civilizations, only improvements available to them that are shown on the following table.

Building strengths and weaknesses
Strong vs. Nothing
Weak vs. Everything
Improvements
Hit points Flying Buttress Flying Buttress (+20%)
Construction cost Cree Textile Craftsmanship Cree Textile Craftsmanship (-25% wood)
Tupi Forest Burning Tupi Forest Burning (-20% wood)
Other Cherokee Basket Weaving Cherokee Basket Weaving (improvements except Mechanized Rice Cultivation and Collective Economy cost no wood)

Home City Cards Edit

As the Rice Paddy is unique to Asian civilizations, only other civilizations' TEAM cards that affect them are shown in the following tables.

History Edit

The evolutionary origins of Rice, the genus oryza, are rooted in such distant history that no exact geographic location has been defined as the true source. A popular theory claims that the ancient supercontinent known as Gondwana, which included most of the landmasses in today’s southern hemisphere, was home to oryza; but when Gondwana split into pieces 200 million years ago, rice traveled with the newly created continents and landforms, populated the new continents and islands that became Africa, South America, Antarctica, Australia, New Zealand, India, and Madagascar.

A rice paddy is an arable selection of land planted with rice seed that is flooded, providing the large amounts of water essential to rice growth. The paddy is irrigated by diverting water from rivers and mountain streams into a complex network of canals developed over years of use. Rice farmers often terrace the paddies up a hillside or slope, which conserves water by allowing it to flow down through successive rice fields. Rice seed is usually planted in a seedbed but transplanted to the paddy as a young plant. The water level begins at a depth of 6 inches, but as the plant grows, farmers gradually drain the water. By harvest time the water is almost entirely drained, and the farmers can collect the rice from the dried fields.

Fifty percent of the world’s rice is grown in paddies that are fed by natural rainfall; thirty-five percent comes from paddies flooded by both rainfall and irrigation. The major rice-producing countries - including China, India, and Vietnam - primarily cultivate paddy rice.

Gallery Edit

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