Age of Empires Series Wiki
Advertisement

Economic building that combines Estate, Mill, and Livestock Pen.
—In-game description

The Hacienda is an economic building in Age of Empires III: Definitive Edition that is unique to the Mexicans.

It replaces the Mill, Livestock Pen, and Estate, combining their functions to act as a source of food or coin, in addition to automatically spawning Cows or Settlers (from the Fortress Age), which can be accelerated by assigning villagers to work in the Hacienda. The Hacienda can only be configured to carry out one of the aforementioned functions at a time.

Unlike the buildings it replaces, the Hacienda has a build limit of seven.

Technologies[]

Age Improvement Cost Effect
Age II tech tree aoe3.png
Seed Drill.png Seed Drill 150 wood,
150 coin
Settlers gather from Mills, Farms, Rice Paddies (food), Fields (food), and Haciendas 15% faster
Selective Breeding.png Selective Breeding 150 wood,
150 coin
Livestock fattens 25% faster
Age III tech tree aoe3.png
Artificial Fertilizer.png Artificial Fertilizer 335 wood,
335 coin
Settlers gather from Mills, Farms, Rice Paddies (food), Fields (food), and Haciendas 30% faster; requires Seed Drill
Bookkeeping.png Bookkeeping 300 food,
300 wood
Settlers gather coin from Estates, Rice Paddies, Fields, and Haciendas 10% faster
Age IV tech tree aoe 3.png
Homesteading.png Homesteading 400 food,
400 wood
Settlers gather coin from Estates, Rice Paddies, Fields, and Haciendas 20% faster; requires Bookkeeping
Refineries.png Refineries 600 food,
600 wood
Settlers gather coin from Estates, Rice Paddies, Fields, and Haciendas 30% faster; requires Homesteading

Further statistics[]

As Haciendas are unique to the Mexicans, only technologies that they have access to are shown in the following table:

Home City Cards[]

As Haciendas are unique to the Mexicans, only their cards and other civilizations' TEAM cards are shown in the following tables:

History[]

As the Spanish settled Central America and established a mercantile economy based on the encomienda system, Haciendas – large estates – became crucial to the system’s functionality. These estates were initially colonial strongholds rich in the production of agricultural and other resources, but after the Mexican independence movement became crucial components of the new nation’s largely agrarian economy. Although they contributed to the economic development of the young nation, Haciendas also served as a constant reminder of the social divisions and inequities that the independence movement had only partially succeeded in eradicating.

Gallery[]

Advertisement