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The Caribou is a huntable animal in Age of Mythology and Age of Empires III.

Age of Mythology Edit

CaribouAOM

The Caribou is found in the lands of the Norse, providing a quick and simple method of gathering food. They are found in packs, the northern version of the deer in Greek lands and the gazelle in Egyptian lands.

Age of Empires III Edit

Large herbivore.
In-game description
Caribou

A herd of Caribous in the Yukon map of Age of Empires III

In Age of Empires III, the caribou appears in the Yukon map, and is present as a unique huntable animal to this map, along with the Musk Ox. They take two shots to kill from villagers, and bear 300 food, making them a standard huntable animal.

History Edit

Scientific Name: Rangifer tarandus
Approx. Size: 44 in. at the shoulder (male), 275 lb.
Diet: Sedges, evergreen leaves, especially lichen

The caribou or reindeer is a large antlered herd animal that frequents high latitudes. The word caribou may have originated from a Micmac word that means "pawer." Caribou are unique among deer in that both males and females have antlers. Caribou migrate a great distance seasonally to calving grounds. They are also capable swimmers. They have long legs, with sharp hooves and hairy toes to provide traction over frozen ground. Caribou are generally silent, but their tendons make sharp clicking sounds that can be heard for a long distance when the animals travel in large groups.

Caribou are preyed upon by bears and wolves; Caribou calves are preyed upon by golden eagles.

Trivia Edit

  • Caribous are unique among huntables for not saying the Animal of Set voices when selected under the player's control (for example, if a Set player converted a Caribou), but for producing their unique tendon clicking when ordered around.
    • Of course, Relic Monkeys and Golden Lions, both animals that are summoned by garrisoning certain Relics to a Temple, produce their natural sounds, though they don't count as huntables.
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